Stuttering Helpful tips for your child Jacksonville

Stuttering: 6 Helpful Tips for Your Child

Stuttering

Also known as a form of dysfluency, stuttering is an interruption in the flow of speech. When children stutter, they’re usually repeating certain phrases, sounds, syllables, and words. Although it’s normal for children between the ages of two and five to stutter, children who stutter past five years old may need special treatment for this language disorder.

Stuttering: how to help my child

The Causes of Stuttering

Many experts believe that there are four primary factors that cause this condition.

  1. Genetics: Approximately 60 percent of people who stutter have a family member who also has this condition than those without.
  2. Child Development: Children with other developmental delays and language or dysfluency problems are more susceptible to this condition.
  3. Neurophysiology: Most children who stutter process language in a different area of the brain than other children. Because of the different way that the brain processes language, such differences in language processing also affects the muscles that control speech.
  4. Family Dynamics: Children who come from a family with a fast-paced lifestyle are also more likely to stutter.

Here’s How You Can Help

As a parent, there are many things that you can do to improve your children’s speaking.

  • Help Your Children’s Fluency: Make sure to model good speaking skills by talking to your children slowly and clearly.
  • Avoid Challenging Situations: When your children are having difficulty speaking, sometimes you may want to give them a break by suggesting activities that don’t require conversations.
  • Give Your Children Undivided Attention: Show your children how much you care by maintaining good eye contact when they’re talking. Make sure that you pause before responding to their comments. Try not to show signs of frustration when they’re talking to you.
  • Reduce The Urge To Criticize: Well-intended phrases like “take your time,” “slow down,” and “remember to breathe” will only discourage your children and make them feel self-conscious. Instead of interrupting to correct or criticize, encourage your children to finish their thoughts.
  • Create A Soothing Home Environment: In a calm atmosphere, your children will feel more comfortable speaking. During family dinners, eliminate distractions like the radio and television so that your children can participate in fun and enjoyable conversation.
  • Offer Your Children Grace: Speaking precisely and correctly shouldn’t always be a requirement. Resist the urge to interrupt your children or tell them to start their sentences over. Avoid telling them to think before speaking.

If you notice the following patterns in your child’s speech, it may be a sign that you should have them evaluated:

  • Conversations that are extremely difficult or strained
  • A gradual increase in syllable, sound, phrases, and whole words repetitions
  • Vocal tension that causes a noticeably loud pitch while talking
  • Repetition of words that is accompanied with facial and body movements
  • The condition continues after your child has turned five years old

⚠ If these symptoms continue after your child had turned five years old, it’s especially important that you meet with a speech-language pathologist. ⚠

Trust Our Professionals To Help Your Child!

If you’re concerned about your child’s stuttering, please schedule a consultation at the Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center as soon as possible! For children who have severe language problems, early evaluation and treatment is extremely critical.

Although there’s currently not a cure for stuttering, there are many great treatments available that can help your child overcome the condition.

Thank You for Making #GivingTuesday 2018 a Success!

GivingTuesday Thank You!

This year, JSHC raised a record-breaking $14,697 from a record 91 donors!

With these funds, our staff will be able to provide 294 speech evaluations and therapy sessions to low-income preschoolers, adding 42 new patients to our programming!

Such success can be attributed to the generosity of our many independent supporters, as well as the deep investment of JSHC staff and Board of Directors, 100 percent of whom participated in the giving campaign.

Thank you to all in our community who continue to support us not only on #GivingTuesday, but every day of the year. We’re proud to serve you and call you part of our family!

#GivingTuesday JSHC Thank You

Support JSHC on #GivingTuesday November 27, 2018

Changing The World One Child At A Time!

#GivingTuesday #GivingtheGiftofCommunication

This year on Tuesday, November 27, 2018, the Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center will participate in #GivingTuesday, a global day dedicated to giving.

#GivingTuesday harnesses the capability of social media along with the generosity of individuals around the world to generate true improvement in their communities; offering a stage so that they can encourage the donation of time, resources, and skills to heal local concerns. Additionally it brings together the shared power of an amazing assortment of partners— nonprofits , civic organizations, businesses, corporations, as well as families and individuals—to encourage and amplify small acts of kindness.

Read more

Fall Giving Celebration at JSHC

Fall Giving Celebration 2018

Fall Giving Celebration at JSHC

Join us to celebrate the generous contributions of our FinFest Sponsors and Fund-A-Child donors!

The evening will feature a dedication ceremony honoring the leadership and contributions of Amy Ruth, and Myron and Amanda Pincomb.

Former Board Chair and longtime supporter Mike Heard will also be honored as our third-ever Director Emeritus.

Guests can RSVP to Sheri Taylor at staylor@shcjax.org or by calling (904) 717-6930.

Communication Don'ts

Communication Don’ts

Communication don’ts

From the time your children are born, the best way to help them learn effective speaking skills is to talk with them all the time. Even when your children are babies, you can still interact with them through the use of smiles, noises, hand claps, and music.

Communicating with your children should be easy, but there are still some important things that you should keep in mind.

Here are some don’ts when interacting with your children.

Talking/Answering For Them

When you talk to your children, always remember to give them the opportunity to respond. Although your children won’t be responding with fluent sentences, they will be learning that people take turns talking. From a young age, children should be encouraged to respond to you even if it’s just with gurgles, smiles, and hand clapping when they’re babies.

Anticipating Their Needs

Along with talking/answering for your children, you can significantly discourage your kids’ need to speak by anticipating their needs. While you may have good intentions, a better approach to anticipating your children’s needs is to ask them to request the things that they would like. The ultimate goal is to encourage your children to feel comfortable voicing their needs by initiating conversation.

Not Responding

Just like it’s important for your children to learn taking turns in conversation by responding to your questions, it’s also important for you to respond to the gestures and speaking attempts of non-verbal children. When you do this effectively, you’ll create a safe environment for your children to talk more.

Ridiculing/Pretending

If your children have difficulty speaking, by all means, don’t ridicule their mistakes. Doing so will only make them self-conscious and less likely to communicate. Be compassionate, and with the help of gestures, you’ll gradually be able to understand what they are saying.

Being Impatient

Whenever your children begin to speak, you should give them as much time as they need to complete their thoughts. Before responding in a hurry, make sure that your children have enough time to process information, think, and respond. In addition to talking, you can also communicate with your children in other ways like using pictures, demonstrations, and other learned strategies.

Always remember the process of talking can be frustrating for the child, too.

Correcting Grammar

As your children begin to speak more, be particularly careful about correcting their grammar. Keep in mind that sentence structure isn’t important until your children have reached three word sentences.

Communication Don'ts with Your Kids

Saying Too Much Too Quickly

Make sure that when you talk with your children, you aren’t saying too much too quickly. Speak slowly, keep directions/comments simple, and allow for processing time.

Dominating The Conversation

Whenever you communicate with your children, it’s a good idea to encourage them to sometimes lead the conversation. Try to be less directive and commanding.

Using Baby Talk

As your children grow, you may find yourself using less baby talk. For optimal communication, consider using language models appropriate to your children’s needs and age groups. Most importantly, make sure that you understand the differences between a simplified model and baby talk.

Requiring Polite Formalities

During the early developmental stages, communication is more important than polite formalities. At this point in learning how to talk, focus on ensuring that your children can speak in complete sentences before requiring them to add “yes ma’am,” “no ma’am” and “yes sir,” “no sir” in their interactions.

Asking Yes/No Questions

Since yes and no questions tend to end a conversation, these types of questions should be avoided. Why not ask open-ended questions instead like “What would you like to drink?” rather than “Would you like to drink some juice?”

Rote/Academic Language Learning

Many parents are unaware that academic learning and rote learning skills like the alphabet, numbers, and colors aren’t important for preschool children to communicate needs. Letters and numerals are symbols without purpose until attributed to spoken language or quantity. Children should have encounters that connect these symbols, letter names and sounds to each other before attempting memorization.

Schedule A Consultation Today!

Does your child have problems with speech or hearing? If so, Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center is here to help! We proudly offer treatments, evaluations, and screenings for a variety of areas. Call us today at 904-355-3403‎ to schedule a consultation!

speech & hearing communication milestones

Identifying Your Child’s Communication Milestones

Identifying Your Child’s Communication Milestones

As a parent of a child between the ages of one month and five years old, you’re probably wondering how you can identify your child’s communication milestones. When it comes to healthy speech and hearing development, these are undoubtedly the most important years of your child’s life. The following pages contain developmental charts which represent, on average, the age by which most children will accomplish the listed skills.

Children typically don’t master all items in a category until they reach the upper age in each age range. Although this range is a great guide that you can use to monitor your little one’s progress, just remember that every child is unique and has an individual rate of development. Keep in mind that your children may not necessarily have a disorder if they haven’t accomplished one skill within an age range. Here’s a brief summary of the important communication milestones. Read more

Language vs. Speech

Language vs. Speech

Language vs. Speech

The ability to share thoughts and ideas effectively starts at an early age. That’s why as the parent of a child, you should understand the common issues that some children face when talking to other people. Once you understand how people typically talk to others, you can proceed to get your child the necessary help they may need.

Read more

Jags Give & Go 2018

Jacksonville Jaguars Give & Go 2018

Continuing an ever-growing tradition, the Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center will be participating in the Jacksonville Jaguars’ Give & Go Program for the fourth year in a row. Join the “Friends of Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center” for our annual tailgate party on December 2! Simply purchase tickets for the Jaguars vs. Colts game, and you’ll receive a VIP invitation to our exclusive celebration.

Jags Give & GoYou can purchase game tickets for $40 through the Center by calling (904) 717-6930 or by emailing Sheri Taylor at STaylor@shcjax.org. All proceeds will benefit the Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center—so, what better way to combine your love of the JSHC’s great work and the Jags’ great team?

Want more ways to support the JSHC and the Jags? We’ve got you covered! For additional games that benefit the JSHC, click here, choose “Jacksonville Speech and Hearing Center, Inc.” from the dropdown arrow of nonprofits, and select the game you wish to attend.