speech and hearing jacksonville

Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center Completes Screening of 2385 Children

speech and hearing jacksonvilleThe Jacksonville Speech and Hearing Center, through grants funded by The Chartrand Family Fund at The Community Foundation for Northeast Florida, The Florida Blue Foundation and Medtronic has completed the screening of 2385 children ages 2 – 5 and provided 1765 speech and language therapy sessions to 79 children who were identified as at risk for communications disorders.  The announcement was made by Mike Howland, President and CEO of the nonprofit.

The purpose of the grants was to provide speech-language pathology screenings, evaluations, and therapy to underserved and under/uninsured pre-kindergarten children located at daycare centers and preschools throughout Duval County.  It is vital to catch and treat speech and hearing disorders at an early age so children will not fall behind in school.

“Young children with speech and language disorders are at increased risk for difficulty with academic performance later in life,” said Dorothy Train-Marsh, a speech pathologist at Jacksonville Speech and Hearing Center. “Speech sound production is key to letter-sound relationships necessary for reading and writing.”

Parents should note the number of words their child uses by pre-kindergarten as well as the ability to string together four to five words in a sentence.  Certain phonological sounds such as saying the letter “v” or “f” should be present around the age of three.

Screenings were provided by ASHA Certified Speech-Language pathologists at over 75 Duval County preschools.speech and hearing jacksonville  Evaluations and therapy were provided to children with Medicaid, uninsured children and underinsured children at more than 35 preschools in Duval County.

“We are grateful to our grantors for helping us to provide this much needed service,” said Howland.  “The Chartrand Foundation, Florida Blue Foundation and Medtronic understand that children need to be ready to learn and communication skills are an important skill set for school.”

The Jacksonville Speech and Hearing Center was founded in 1949 by the Junior League of Jacksonville.  Today this nonprofit, located at 1128 N. Laura St., serves children, adults and seniors providing screenings, evaluations and treatments in the areas of speech pathology and audiology.  Most major insurances are accepted.

JSHC Hearing Aid

Why Buy Hearing Aids from Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center?

If you or your loved one is in the market for hearing aids, rest assured the Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center is your best resource for hearing aids in North Florida. Today’s hearing aids are highly programmable with customized settings for your individual hearing needs. We have licensed doctoral level audiologists to assist you, a wide variety of hearing aid types and styles and we offer ongoing support and assistance since getting hearing aids is just the first step in the process of improved hearing. Read on to learn the many other reasons why to buy Hearing Aids from Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center.

Why Buy Hearing Aids from Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center?

We offer a broad range of hearing aids including a variety of both In-The-Ear and Behind-The-Ear styles.

JSHC has qualified and experienced audiologists on staff. Our audiologists will select the best style of hearing aid for the specific hearing loss you have, keeping in mind any cosmetic and lifestyle concerns you may have.

We treat our patients with care, and not just as customers. At the Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center, we put you and your family first. We know that treatment for speech, language or hearing disorders is not just about the individual; it is about enabling families to connect, communicate and care for one another.

We accept all major insurance plans. 

We offer many hearing aid services such as adjustments and repairs.

All hearing aids have a 30-day trial period.

Want to learn more? Check out our latest patient testimonial on YouTube: Amy R. shares insight into being diagnosed with hearing loss, her experience getting hearing aids and helpful tips for living with hearing aids. CLICK HERE TO VIEW.

Hearing Aids: Helpful Tips & What to Expect

Deaf woman takes a hearing testWe recently spoke with Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center patient Amy R. and asked her to share her experience with hearing loss diagnosis and with wearing hearing aids. Amy offers some helpful suggestions and insight.

 

How do I adjust to hearing aids?

A lot of people worry that when they get hearing aids they’re going to have problems adjusting. While I didn’t have a lot of issues, I know some people do. What I would say to them is go to Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center to have them identify what’s going on. Since hearing aids are now digital, when you go through the hearing test, they simply plug your hearing aid into the computer. This way they can determine where you lack the ability to hear. For me, high-pitched sounds are increased as opposed to the low pitch. There is no reason you have to suffer if you feel like you can’t adjust. I know the people at Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center can help you.

 

What are the benefits of hearing aids?

I know what it is like to struggle with hearing loss. Even with hearing aids my hearing isn’t perfect. I would encourage people to seek answers because there are so many wonderful things in life to hear like children or grandchildren, music, or maybe your work. When I put my hearing aids in in the morning and I hear my cat snore and I hear the birds tweet outside, then I know this is something I would miss out on if I didn’t have the tools to hear.

 

How do I convince my spouse to get tested for hearing aids?Ear examination

My hearing aids were so helpful to me that I convinced my husband to go have his hearing tested. Initially I thought he was just ignoring me as some husbands will playfully. I did think part of that was because he couldn’t hear me. Sure enough, he went and got tested, and he needed hearing aids as well. Now when he doesn’t hear me, I know it’s not about the hearing, it is about the topic! His hearing loss is different than mine, so having that special test with an audiologist who has decades of experience helped define what kind of hearing aid he needed to wear as opposed to what kind of hearing aid I wear.

 

Does family history play a role in needing hearing aids?

I come from a family that has a lot of hearing problems, but I still thought it would never happen to me. Then one day I found myself in the ear nose and throat doctor’s office and they told me I probably needed to get hearing aids. It was a very scary experience. My doctor recommended I go to the Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center. Even though I had lived in Jacksonville a long time, I didn’t really know them. I was thrilled when I got there to meet Dr. Mattson. Dr. Mattson is a young woman who grew up wearing hearing aids so she knew exactly what to tell me about the process. I didn’t want to appear like an old lady. I didn’t want to have all the feedback my grandmother had with her hearing aids, but most of all I wanted to be able to do my job. As a public relations professional, if you can’t communicate, which includes listening to clients, listening to media, and listening to coworkers, you cannot be a good public relations professional. Dr. Mattson walked me through the process, got me fitted with my first pair of hearing aids. When I totally freaked out when I was hearing all the sounds I hadn’t heard in a long time, she helped me with that too. It was great to have someone who understood what I was going through and could react to that. That was seven or eight years ago. I’m on my second pair of hearing aids now, and frankly, I could not have a conversation without me having hearing aids since I have lost all the higher registers. I can’t hear certain voices, especially female voices since they tend to be higher registers. It has changed my life. I am so grateful to Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center. As a nonprofit, I know they think about me the patient, and that they are going to recommend something that works especially for me as opposed to something that may be “on special” at another company. Nice people, convenient location, people who know what I am going through, it’s a win-win.

 

Hispanic woman giving senior Hispanic couple bad newsTell us about hearing loss diagnosis.

When I started to lose my hearing, I didn’t want to face reality. My children said to me “Mom, you’re not hearing.” and I would say “No, no, no.”  In the office when I was meeting with clients, it was like all of the sudden I lost the ability to understand what I was doing there because I could not hear. When you can’t hear, your cognition and your understanding of your environment just goes down the tubes. So I finally got up the nerve to go to the ear nose and throat doctor who said I had to go to Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center. Don’t go to a place that only sells one type of hearing aid because you only get what they have, not necessarily what you need.

 

What tools are there for living with hearing aids?

If you are suffering from hearing loss and you are thinking about getting hearing aids, there are a number of tools that work with hearing aids that could make your life even easier. There is a streamer which is a Bluetooth enabled piece of equipment. It enables you to pair your Bluetooth smart phone with your hearing aid. For example, if you’re driving in your car and you get a call, it will ring through your hearing aids. You press the button on the streamer and you can just talk, you don’t have to hold the phone, and you can hear the conversation perfectly because it is coming right into your ears. There is also equipment you can add to your home phone or your home television that will enable the sounds to go directly to your hearing aids. They can be a godsend, particularly with television shows that have a lot of dialogue or when they have young actors who mumble or talk to the floor and you can’t see their face.

 

How can hearing aids change the impact of hearing loss on business?

Getting hearing aids meant the world to my business because as I mentioned, I couldn’t hear clients, or I couldn’t hear conversations on the phone, or couldn’t talk to my co-workers. If you’re struggling to hear at work, or if you work with someone who is struggling to hear, be compassionate. Explain to them that you know there is an answer there. You can get some help. There is someone who has gone through what they are going through. Try to be understanding when they go through the process of getting hearing aids. Getting hearing aids does not automatically mean you can hear a pin drop. Tell people “Please don’t talk to the floor” or “Please look at me when you talk” or “Don’t mumble, learn to project”. Don’t be embarrassed to say “I didn’t catch that”. Lots of times with clients now, I’m not embarrassed about hearing aids, I’ll tell them upfront that I’m wearing hearing aids which means sometimes I might miss something. I tell them if it looks like I don’t understand or that I haven’t heard them, it’s okay to say to me “Did you hear that?”  I won’t feel bad about it.

tinnitus jacksonville

What is Tinnitus?

Tinnitus is a very common condition. It is a noise heard in the head or ears. Tinnitus affects people differently and can be described as low pitched, high pitched, constant, or intermittent. It can come across as ringing, roaring, buzzing, whistling, or humming. WATCH to learn more about tinnitus in this informative interview.

What is Tinnitus?

jacksonville events finfest

Top 7 Reasons You Should Join Us for FinFest!

 

jacksonville events finfest

If you want to support a worthy cause AND have a fabulous time, join us for our annual fundraising event, FinFest 2015: Return to the River, on May 30, 2015. FinFest is our largest fundraiser, raising the funds needed for Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center to provide our community with quality speech and hearing services. Here are our Top 7 reasons you will want to get your tickets to FinFest 2015: Return to the River.

Top 7 Reasons You Should Join Us for FinFest

1. This is Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center’s biggest fundraising event. As the only non-profit agency in Northeast Florida accredited for both speech-language pathology and audiology services, we provide high quality care through the generosity of our community to ensure no one is turned away. In 2014, the Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center helped 5,290 people with speech and hearing disorders in Northeast Florida through professional speech and audiology therapies. This is your opportunity to make a difference.

2. Through our Preschool Communication Initiative, we have provided speech and hearing screenings to 2,385 children at 75 preschools in Duval County. It is our vision that every child aged 3 to 5 in a five-county Northeast Florida area will be identified, diagnosed and treated for speech, language and hearing disorders, enabled to start kindergarten on an even keel developmentally, free from stigma, with their classmates.

3. Listen to excellent live music from St. Augustine’s Henry and the Seahawks. Henry and the SeaHawks are known for their tropical hoedown style music played with passion, sweat, and as they like to say- “sunshine.”

4. Enjoy the beautiful scenery at the Timuquana Country Club. Timuquana Country Club is one of Florida’s premier country clubs as well as one of the oldest in Jacksonville. The club’s location on the western edge of the St. Johns River gives it a “million dollar view” of the Jacksonville skyline.

5. Meet First Coast News Anchor Katie Jeffries and our Honorary Co-Chairs.  As our official Master of Ceremonies, Katie will bring her professional experience and pleasant personality to ensure you know when all the special events of the evening are happening. Moody and Natali Chisholm, John and Gena Delaney, Artis and Enola Gay Gilmore, Robert and Margaret Hill, and John Falconetti and Shannon Miller will serve as our Honorary Co-Chairs of FinFest.

6. Participate in an auction to acquire fabulous items. With quality items donated from local and national businesses, athletes, artists, and authors, you are sure to find a valuable treasure.

7. Let us not forget- have FUN! Make sure to put on your best Hawaiian/Beach casual outfit, invite your friends, make new connections and be ready to have a memorable evening!

Make sure to join us on our Facebook event page and invite your friends!jacksonville events finfest

For sponsorship and ticket info, contact Kristen Dietzen at 904-355-3403 or kdietzen@shcjax.org.

For auction donations, contact Cathy Howland at 904-355-3403 or chowland@shcjax.org.

We will see you there!

jacksonville events finfest

Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center FinFest 2015: Return to the River

In 2014, the Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center helped 5,290 people with speech and hearing disorders in Northeast Florida through professional speech and audiology therapies. We served the counties of Duval, St. Johns, Nassau, Clay and Baker.  Of the more than 5,000 people we assisted, 76 percent were either uninsured or underinsured. These services were largely made possible by the funds raised at FinFest.

As the only non-profit agency in Northeast Florida accredited for both speech-language pathology and audiology services, we provide the highest quality compassionate care through the generosity of individuals, corporations, foundations, and partnering organizations ensuring that no one is turned away.

We invite you to join us for FinFest 2015: Return to the River so we can continue to provide speech and audiology services to the members of the Jacksonville community. SAVE THE DATE on Facebook.

FinFest 2015: Return to the River

FinFest 2014

FinFest 2014

Date: Saturday, May 30, 2015

Venue: Timuquana Country Club, 4028 Timuquana Road, Jacksonville FL 32210

(off of Roosevelt Blvd., not far from NAS JAX)

Time: 7-11pm

MC: First Coast News Anchor Katie Jefferies

Entertainment: Henry and the Seahawks

FinFest 2014

FinFest 2014 Festivities

Attire: Hawaiian/Beach Casual

Interested in being a sponsor, donating to the auction or volunteering? Please contact us!

Sponsorship and Ticket  Info: Kristen Dietzen 355-3403 or kdietzen@shcjax.org

Auction Donations: Cathy Howland 355-3403 chowland@shcjax.org

SAVE THE DATE on Facebook.

Did you know? FinFest is supported by a grant from the Endowed $10,000 Event Grant Fund established by Delores Barr Weaver. Click to read the article in the Jacksonville Business Journal.
hyperacusis

Noise sensitivity? We have answers about Hyperacusis

What is hyperacusis?

Hyperacusis is a lowered tolerance or sense of discomfort to sounds that would not trouble the typical person. It can occur slowly or suddenly. Often, sounds such as walking on carpet can be unpleasantly loud or painful. Communicating with others can be very challenging with hyperacusis.

To me, noise is extremely loud. What causes this affect?

hyperacusis

Sensitivity to noise or hyperacusis can make everyday activities unnerving.

Some of the most common causes of hyperacusis or sensitivity to noise include head injury, ear damage from toxins or medication, viral infections involving the inner ear, TMJ syndrome, and Lyme disease.

Does hyperacusis cause hearing loss?

Although an individual with hyperacusis may have a hearing loss, there isn’t a direct correlation between the two. Hyperacusis doesn’t have any relation to hearing thresholds.

Is there a treatment plan for hyperacusis?

There is a treatment for Hyperacusis called Hyperacusis Therapy. This therapy focuses on desensitization through exposure to low sound levels.

Did you find this information helpful? If so, please share using the social media icons below.

tinnitus

Ringing in your ears? We have answers about Tinnitus

What causes noise or ringing in my ears?

tinnitus

Tinnitus can be caused by exposure to loud noise, medical illness or head and neck trauma.

The leading cause of ringing in the ears, which is known as tinnitus, is exposure to loud noise such as concerts or gunfire. There are other factors that can trigger tinnitus as well including age related hearing loss, certain medications or head and neck injuries.

Is there a cure or treatment plan for tinnitus?

There is a treatment plan for tinnitus called Tinnitus Retraining Therapy. It is not a cure for tinnitus but rather a management program. Treatment works by helping to lessen the individual’s perception of the noise. Tinnitus retraining therapy typically lasts about 18 months with success rates of about 80 percent.

What is tinnitus?

Tinnitus is a very common condition. It is a noise heard in the head or ears. Tinnitus affects people differently and can be described as low pitched, high pitched, constant, or intermittent. It can come across as ringing, roaring, buzzing, whistling, or humming.

What is sound therapy and how does it work?

Sound therapy is a treatment to help manage tinnitus symptoms. Sound therapy works by making the perception of the tinnitus less noticeable compared to background sound that is delivered through the sound therapy device. Most patients find the use of background sound very helpful when used in combination with Tinnitus Retraining Therapy.

Does tinnitus cause hearing loss?

Tinnitus on its own doesn’t cause hearing loss. It is very common in people with hearing loss; however, not all people with hearing loss will develop tinnitus.

Was this information helpful? If so, please share it using the social media icons below. Thank you.

Onset adult hearing loss

Adult Speech Disorders and Hearing Loss

An interview with Mike Howland, CEO

Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center

What can cause onset speech impairment in adults?

There are a variety of reasons why an adult may have onset speech impairment. The onset of speech, swallowing, and/or language disorders in adults may be caused by a stroke, traumatic brain injury, a disease that affects motor skill (ALS, Parkinson’s Disease), cognition (Alzheimer’s Disease), hearing loss, and/or anatomical/structural deviation of the oral cavity (e.g., vocal nodules, polyps, cysts, oral cancer).

How can family members best help a loved one that has a speech impairment?

It can be very difficult to come to accept that there is a disorder. A speech and language pathologist can be a partner who guides the patient and family to identify goals to work on together in order to foster communication and understanding. A few tips we would offer for adult speech disorders and hearing loss include:

Onset adult hearing loss

Onset adult hearing loss can lead to social anxiety and frustration. If you or a loved one is suffering from hearing loss, please call the professionals at Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center to schedule a hearing test.

• Maintain a natural conversational manner appropriate for an adult.

• Minimize distractions, such as a blaring radio, whenever possible.

• Include the person with a speech or language disorder in conversations.

• Ask for and value the opinion of the person especially regarding family matters.

• Encourage any type of communication, whether it is speech, gesture, pointing, or drawing.

• Avoid correcting the individual’s speech.

• Allow the individual plenty of time to talk.

• Help the individual become involved outside the home. Seek out support groups.

How can hearing loss impact an adult person’s quality of life?

Having a hearing loss can significantly impact a person’s ability to communicate with others, and lead to a reduced quality of life.  The most common ways hearing loss can manifest in a person’s life is through:

  • increased anxiety,
  • social isolation and withdrawal,
  • frustration,
  • anger,
  • depression,
  • self-criticism,
  • panic disorders,
  • social phobias,
  • difficulty concentrating, especially when communicating with others.

How can I tell if my parent has hearing loss?

Hearing loss is rarely sudden or total, unless you are exposed to an exceptionally loud noise. It’s usually gradual – sometimes so gradual that your family and friends may notice the problem before you do. Here are ten questions that will help you determine whether friend or family member is suffering from hearing loss.  If you answered “yes” to three or more of these questions, you may want to schedule a professional hearing evaluation with an audiologist.

1. Do you have a problem hearing over the telephone?

2. Do you have trouble following the conversation when two or more people are talking at the same time?

3. Do people complain that you turn the TV volume up too high?

4. Do you have to strain to understand conversation?

5. Do you have trouble hearing in a noisy background?

6. Do you find yourself asking people to repeat themselves?

7. Do many people you talk to seem to mumble (or not speak clearly)?

8. Do you misunderstand what others are saying and respond inappropriately?

9. Do you have trouble understanding the speech of women and children?

10. Do people get annoyed because you misunderstand what they say?

How can family members help a loved one that has hearing loss?

Set Your Stage

1. Face person directly.

2. Avoid noisy backgrounds.

3. Get attention first.

Get the Point Across

1. Don’t shout.

2. Speak clearly, at moderate pace, not over-emphasizing words.

3. Re-phrase if you are not understood.

4. Use facial expressions, gestures.

In closing, the most important thing a family member can do to help a loved one with onset hearing loss is to get a hearing test.

children with hearing problems

Speech and Language Disorders in Children

An Interview with Mike Howland, CEO

Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center

What are the main causes of speech and language disorders in children?

Speech and Language disorders may be the result of a variety of etiologies and many disorders have no clear cause but they may include:

  • a motor speech disorder (Apraxia),

    children with hearing problems

    Hearing and speech disorders in children may be caused by a variety of issues. If you think that your child may have a hearing, speech or language disorder, please contact your primary care physician to ask for a referral to the speech & hearing professionals at Jacksonville Speech & Hearing Center.

  • a physical/ structural cause (cleft palate, overbite, short frenulum),
  • be a symptom of a syndrome (Down syndrome, Fragile X),
  • a neurological problem (Cerebral Palsy),
  • a traumatic event (traumatic brain injury, lack of oxygen at birth),
  • a sensory deficiency (hearing impairment),
  • Auditory Processing Disorders,
  • intellectual disability,
  • developmental delay,
  • language based learning disability,
  • Autism,
  • environmental deprivation.

In short, there are hundreds of possible causes that can facilitate the need for speech and/or language therapy.

What is the first step I should take if I notice my child’s speech is delayed?

Speak with your Primary Care Doctor about getting a referral for a Hearing Test, if one has not already been completed, as well as a referral for a Speech & Language Evaluation.

How can I tell if my child’s speech and language is on track?

There are expected language behaviors for different ages.  For example, by 1 year of age, a child should use one or two words, follow simple requests (ie. “Come here”), and understand simple questions (ie. “Where are your shoes?”).  By 2-3 years of age, the child should be using two or three words sentences to talk about and ask for things and following two requests (ie. “Get the ball and put it on the table”).  Parents should also understand the child’s speech most of the time. Children are individuals and do develop at slower or faster rates than expected.  What is most important is that the child shows continuous language growth.

For more detailed look at the developmental milestones at each age refer to www.asha.org for the following:

What is the difference between a speech disorder and language impairment?

When a person is unable to articulate or produce speech sounds correctly or fluently (ability to speak without stuttering), or has problems with his or her voice (e.g., hoarseness, vocal nodules), then he or she has a speech disorder.

When a person has trouble understanding others (receptive language), or sharing thoughts, ideas, and feelings completely (expressive language), or interacting and having appropriate social skills with others (pragmatics), then he or she has a language disorder. Both children and adults can have speech and language disorders. They can occur as a result of a medical problem or have no known cause.

How can I help my child with a hearing problem cope at school?

Federal law allows students with hearing loss to have a free and appropriate public education alongside non–disabled students, to the extent possible, up to 12th grade. Even though a child may have a hearing aid or cochlear implant they will probably still need assistive technology, modified acoustics, and accessible teaching strategies to participate fully in noisy classrooms. In post-secondary institutions students must advocate for accessibility through the school administration. Many schools have disabled student offices that can coordinate accessibility requests.